Mar 082012
 

Scott Tucker-owned Level 5 Motorsports stands out as the first American Le Mans Prototype (LMP) admittance from the Le Mans circuit in Twenty-five years, and discovering he’s a bit of a pioneer, Tucker has made sure the team’s-and the country’s-debut from the series is established for success.

As soon as Tucker and mentor/co-driver Christophe Bouchut received the chance to get involved in the LMP class of American Le Mans and Intercontinental Le Mans Cup in 2010, they completed the season with a class championship win, of which knocked them to the LMP2 class for the present yr. To begin with the season strong, Tucker put in LMP2 veteran Luis Diaz to the mix. Diax, of Mexico, had been racing LMP2s since 2007, when he raced a Lola B06/43-Acura for Fernandez Racing and got the class championship in ’09.

With that, Level 5 Motorsports tore on the ALMS schedule, posting wins on the 12 Hours of Sebring, the Long Beach Circuit and 24 Hours of Le Mans, and notable performances at the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Infineon and Imola in Italy. Only getting better from there, Tucker and the Level 5 team received a new Honda chassis prototype-the HPD ARX-01g-just soon enough for the American Le Mans Series Monterey at Mazda Laguna Seca Raceway. They made a podium end with the brand new prototype, and it was technically set up as an LMP2 powerhouse.

Currently, Tucker for a second time stacks his deck for LMP2 competition with Marino Franchitti, being the fifth and ultimate driver for the two-car entry in the 14th annual Petit Le Mans operated by Mazda. Franchitti can become a member of Tucker, Diaz and Bouchut in the team’s No. 055 Microsoft Office-sponsored HPD ARX-01g in the 1,000-mile, 10-hour series at Road Atlanta, the pinnacle of the ALMS provided by Tequila Patron.

“I’m very excited to be joining Level 5 Motorsports for Petit Le Mans,” Franchitti says. “Having driven every iteration of the HPD up until this new model, I can’t wait to get in the new car. Level 5 is no doubt a top team that’s putting all of the resources they need behind this program.”

And Tucker will continue to impress with how long his resources will go. Franchitti is a essential supplement on the currently stocked team-as portion of the development stages of the ARX-01a, he was one of the first drivers behind the HPD family’s wheels. Then he spent two years racing LMP2s with Dyson Racing just before rejoining HPD models with Highcroft Racing as the 3 rd driver for the ALMS voyage. He received the overall pole position at the 12 Hours of Sebring and won at Laguna Seca and Petit Le Mans, combined with driver and team championship for Highcroft. In this year’s 12 Hours of Sebring, Franchitti was runner-up with Highcroft’s LMP1 car, the largest prototype class.

Franchitti isn’t brand-new to Level 5, either; he has worked with engineers Rick Mayer and Jeff Braun. “A car is a car, and guys like Scott, Christophe and Joao [Barbosa] are good to drive it to the maximum that it’s capable of,” Franchitti says. With Level 5 Motorsports, the prospect is perfect for Franchitti attaining a hat trick of LMP2 victories in Petit Le Mans.

“We’re ecstatic to have Marino on board,” Tucker proclaimed. “With the momentum we’ve built up to this point in the season, with the boost of our new prototype, we’re optimistic for a strong performance at Petit Le Mans. Marino is an obvious choice for this team, and we’re glad to have him.”

In a few days, Franchitti will officially take the wheel as a Level 5 driver during the two-day test at Road Atlanta. The group also is expecting to have its second car at the track, an ILMC-designated No. 33 HPD. The Petit Le Mans revs up on October. 1.

To view Scott Tucker’s profile visit Scott Tucker .

Mar 082012
 

Scott Tucker-owned Level 5 Motorsports will be the very first American Le Mans Prototype (LMP) access within the Le Mans circuit in Twenty five years, and understanding he’s somewhat of a pioneer, Tucker makes certain the team’s-and the country’s-debut within the series is established for achievement.

As soon as Tucker and mentor/co-driver Christophe Bouchut got the chance to participate in the LMP class of American Le Mans and Intercontinental Le Mans Cup in 2010, they completed the season having a class championship win, that knocked them to the LMP2 class for that present yr. To begin with the season strong, Tucker added in LMP2 expert Luis Diaz to the mix. Diax, of Mexico, has been auto racing LMP2s since 2007, whenever he competed a Lola B06/43-Acura for Fernandez Racing and received the class championship in ’09.

With this, Level 5 Motorsports ripped within the ALMS schedule, placing wins on the 12 Hours of Sebring, the Long Beach Circuit and Twenty four hours of Le Mans, in addition to amazing performances at the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Infineon and Imola in Italy. Solely bettering from that point, Tucker plus the Level 5 team purchased a new Honda chassis prototype-the HPD ARX-01g-just soon enough for the American Le Mans Series Monterey at Mazda Laguna Seca Raceway. The team made a podium finish while using completely new prototype, and it was basically identified as an LMP2 powerhouse.

Right now, Tucker once more piles his deck for LMP2 rivalry by having Marino Franchitti, being the 5th and ultimate driver for the two-car entry in the 14th annual Petit Le Mans operated by Mazda. Franchitti will certainly join Tucker, Diaz and Bouchut in the team’s No. 055 Microsoft Office-sponsored HPD ARX-01g during the 1,000-mile, 10-hour showdown at Road Atlanta, which is the best of the ALMS provided by Tequila Patron.

“I’m very excited to be joining Level 5 Motorsports for Petit Le Mans,” Franchitti stated. “Having driven every iteration of the HPD up until this new model, I can’t wait to get in the new car. Level 5 is no doubt a top team that’s putting all of the resources they need behind this program.”

Additionally Tucker continues make an impression with what lengths his sources will go. Franchitti is a important component on the presently stocked team-as portion of the development steps of the ARX-01a, he was one of the primary drivers driving the HPD family’s wheels. Then put in a couple of years racing LMP2s with Dyson Racing just before rejoining HPD models with Highcroft Racing as the 3 rd driver for its ALMS trip. He attained the pole placement at the 12 Hours of Sebring and won at Laguna Seca and Petit Le Mans, as well as driver and team championship for Highcroft. With this year’s 12 Hours of Sebring, Franchitti was runner-up with Highcroft’s LMP1 car, the best prototype class.

Franchitti isn’t completely new to Level 5, either; he has worked with engineers Rick Mayer and Jeff Braun. “A car is a car, and guys like Scott, Christophe and Joao [Barbosa] are good to drive it to the maximum that it’s capable of,” Franchitti said. With Level 5 Motorsports, the possibility is good for Franchitti earning a hat trick of LMP2 victories in Petit Le Mans.

“We’re ecstatic to have Marino on board,” Tucker stated. “With the momentum we’ve built up to this point in the season, with the boost of our new prototype, we’re optimistic for a strong performance at Petit Le Mans. Marino is an obvious choice for this team, and we’re glad to have him.”

In the future, Franchitti will officially grab the wheel as being a Level 5 driver during the two-day test out at Road Atlanta. They also is expecting to have its 2nd vehicle around the track, an ILMC-designated No. 33 HPD. The Petit Le Mans revs up on Oct. 1.

Find more about Scott Tucker Scott Tucker .

Mar 082012
 

It requires terrific focus, drive, pure talent and big time spent in the practice ring for an athlete to master her or his sport to the point of being amongst the top competitors on the earth. It requires twice that recipe for an athlete to reach mastery of two diverse playing positions inside that sport. What has it taken for Level 5 Motorsports owner and driver Scott Tucker to arive at outstanding status in several different sports car racing series-all at the same time? Only Scott Tucker knows that.

Not only has Tucker kept an improbable agenda of races in the American Le Mans Series, Grand-Am series, Ferrari Challenge series and the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup series, but he has in fact was successful in all of them. Let alone a few of his victories came on the same weekends as other wins, since Tucker was often double, triple or quadruple-scheduled.

Tucker’s recent podium finish was with a brand new vehicle, last weekend at the American Le Mans Series Monterey at Mazda Laguna Seca Raceway. The Microsoft Office-sponsored car was the product of a partnership concerning Honda Performance Development and Wirth Research. The HPD ARX-01g really helped the team reach its finest all round finish of the season, at fourth. The automobile was cutting edge for the team and for Tucker, but being in the exact LMP2 category, it wasn’t the severest vehicle discrepancy Tucker had ever faced.

Tucker helped drive Level 5 Motorsports to a win at the 12 Hours of Sebring, a excruciating endurance race in Florida at the Sebring International Raceway. That exact weekend, he was also schedule to drive in the Porsche GT3 Cup. He drove, and he won-his second win of the weekend in as many races.

These triumphs would be a little less extraordinary if the vehicles were anything alike. When a driver competes in a race, he sustains significant g-forces, incredibly hot temperatures, hours of intense focus and effort, and constant critical thought. In endurance racing especially, to pass through these conditions and come out on top seems a superhuman feat-but to leave the podium finish and do it all another time, only to finish up on another podium-seems downright unattainable.

“I lose five to seven pounds every race,” Tucker says. So that you can hold his overstocked race schedule, he has to manage serious control in his physical regimen as well as his health. To condition for less extreme schedules, he has woken up at 4:30 a.m. to do one hour of cardio workout before performing other training. His current 2011 schedule is more strenuous.

“Driving a Porsche and a prototype couldn’t be anything more different,” Tucker said while at Sebring. “I’ve done it in the past, and I’ve kind of gotten used to it, but it’s still a pretty difficult thing to do.”

The automobiles involve different driving styles, Tucker reported. His success in all four series has shown his versatility and strength as a driver, as well as his profound determination to win. But in particular, it demonstrates the love for the sport. Having entered the industry as a newbie in 2006 at the age of Forty four, Tucker didn’t have a lot of time to waste. He has always entered every race he can and treated each one as if it were his last chance for a championship. His success not only as a relatively recent driver but also as a multi-car driver is evidence that in sports, anything can be done.

Find more about Scott Tucker Scott Tucker .

Mar 072012
 

Competitive sports car racing isn’t really the great spectator activity that, say, football is: Zooming past a checkered flag at 200 mph doesn’t leave much space for a victory dance. But motor racing followers are just as vital to drivers as football followers are to wide receivers.

Level 5 Motorsports owner and driver Scott Tucker begins and ends races with his fans. After drivers’ conferences at races, before he hits the track, he heads over to sign autographed memorabilia for supporters. “This is where it really starts,” he has said. “Having a big fan base coming to watch you gets everybody excited and pumped up.”

To tell the truth, Tucker would still race even if not a single person ended up to watch him-which makes him the perfect kind of professional athlete: a man who in fact loves the sport. His total dismiss for any of the advantages that could come with being as flourishing as he has been, with a particular story to boot, have a way of getting individuals to the sport: What could make an investor from Leawood, Kansas enter into the field of professional sports vehicle racing as a 44-year-old rookie? Tucker’s narrative, an anomaly in an industry in which drivers have often been training for tens of years by the time they hit 44, has caught the attention of the Discovery Channel, which broadcasted the feature video “Daytona Dream,” about Tucker and Level 5’s 2010 quest and ultimate achievement of a podium finish after 24 hours of grueling, persistent competition.

Supporters particularly north america have looked to Tucker also because his is the first Le Mans Prototype entrance from the country in Twenty-five years. What made him enter in the ALMS? Not a sponsorship or a pay increase or anything other than the belief that he merely wished to, a shift that then begs the query, what’s so trendy about Le Mans Prototype cars? The answer then is, a lot-something Tucker helps advertise to a fan base that is inundated with Nascar, Grand-Am and Ferrari more so than LMP.

Actually, Tucker withdrew from a handful of valuable races in the 2011 season while he awaited the concluding details on a absolutely new, cost-capped Honda car for the team. For Level 5, that was on a breakaway winning season, the vehicle had to be well worth surrendering points and podium appearances. For Tucker, it absolutely was. He’d been checking up-dates on the vehicle and decided it was the most efficient model available in the LMP2 class.

“The fans are important to me because ultimately, we feel the same way about competitive sports car racing,” Tucker stated. “Only, I get to be the one behind the wheel, and if I can share that with them, and they’re excited about it too, then that’s the best thing.”

Not really that Tucker is a particularly tough figure to rally behind. Not merely is his history captivating and his adoration for the activity undeniable-his record is actually darn effective. He won his second consecutive T1 division national championship for the SCCA runoffs at Road America, and in 2010, he served Ferrari as a test driver as it developed the next generation of supercar, the 599XX. In ’09, Tucker scored a single-season record of 10 wins in the Ferrari Challenge series and won the Ferrari Challenge Dealership Championship for Boardwalk Ferrari. He also won the Sports Car Club of America National Championship in a Ferrari 430.

After working his way through the Ferrari Challenge series and the Grand-Am series, Tucker, together with mentor and co-driver Bouchut, took a way for Le Mans Prototype class competition and in 2010 won the LMP class championship, which knocked them up to the LMP2 class for 2011.

With drivers’ championships all but official this season for Tucker and Bouchut, the Level 5 Motorsports team continues to deliver action-packed, podium-worthy performances for the fans. Having stayed mostly out of the spotlight, Tucker isn’t your ordinary sports hero, but that’s because he’s as much a fan of the activity as he is a driver in it.

Find more information about champion driver Scott Tucker Scott Tucker

Mar 042012
 

Competitive sports car racing isn’t quite the great spectator sport that, say, football is: Soaring past a checkered flag at 200 miles per hour doesn’t leave much room for a triumph dance. But motor racing fans are just as esential to motorists as football spectators are to wide receivers.

Level 5 Motorsports owner and driver Scott Tucker starts and ends races together with fans. After drivers’ meetings at races, ahead of he hits the track, he heads up to sign autographs for followers. “This is where it really starts,” he has said. “Having a big fan base coming to watch you gets everybody excited and pumped up.”

In fact, Tucker would still race even if not a solo person ended up to watch him-which makes him the most efficient kind of professional athlete: someone who completely loves the adventure. His total dismiss for any of the added benefits which can come with being as flourishing as he has been, with a distinctive story to boot, have a way of drawing people to the sport: What would make an investor from Leawood, Kansas enter into the arena of professional sports car racing as a 44-year-old rookie? Tucker’s narrative, an anomaly in an industry in which drivers have often been training for years and years by the time they hit 44, has caught the eye of the Discovery Channel, which broadcasted the feature video “Daytona Dream,” about Tucker and Level 5’s 2010 quest and ultimate achievement of a podium finish after 24 hours of grueling, prolonged competition.

Supporters specifically in the United States have looked to Tucker also mainly because his is the 1st Le Mans Prototype entry from the country in 25 years. What made him enter into the ALMS? Not just a sponsorship or a pay raise or anything other than the fact that he just simply desired to, a move that then begs the query, what’s so impressive about Le Mans Prototype cars? The answer will be, a lot-something Tucker has helped promote to a group of followers that is inundated with Nascar, Grand-Am and Ferrari more so than LMP.

The reality is, Tucker withdrew from a couple of vital races in the 2011 season as he awaited the finishing touches on a modern, cost-capped Honda automobile for the team. For Level 5, which was on a breakaway outstanding season, the vehicle had to be worth surrendering points and podium appearances. For Tucker, it absolutely was. He’d been watching updates on the automobile and made a decision it was the most impressive model available in the LMP2 class.

“The fans are important to me because ultimately, we feel the same way about competitive sports car racing,” Tucker pointed out. “Only, I get to be the one behind the wheel, and if I can share that with them, and they’re excited about it too, then that’s the best thing.”

Not that Tucker is an especially troublesome figure to rally behind. Not merely is his tale interesting and his love for the sport undeniable-his record is actually darn nice. He won his 2nd consecutive T1 division national championship for the SCCA runoffs at Road America, and in 2010, he served Ferrari as a test driver as it developed the next generation of supercar, the 599XX. In 2009, Tucker scored a single-season record of 10 victories in the Ferrari Challenge series and won the Ferrari Challenge Dealership Championship for Boardwalk Ferrari. He also won the Sports Car Club of America National Championship in a Ferrari 430.

After working his way through the Ferrari Challenge series and the Grand-Am series, Tucker, together with instructor and co-driver Bouchut, took an opportunity for Le Mans Prototype class competition and in 2010 won the LMP class championship, which knocked them up to the LMP2 class for 2011.

With drivers’ championships all but official this season for Tucker and Bouchut, the Level 5 Motorsports team continues to deliver action-packed, podium-worthy performances for its fans. Having kept mostly out of the spotlight, Tucker isn’t your regular sports hero, but that’s because he’s as much a fan of the action as he is a driver in it.

Find more about Scott Tucker Scott Tucker .

Feb 222012
 

Scott Tucker with the exceptional Level 5 Motorsports teammates recently began the end quarter of a racing year that has included numerous podium appearances, multiple car changes, incredible accomplishments yet still room for improvement. Tucker, owner and driver for Level 5, has become a leader to the team in spite of the rookie status he maintained just months ago. His tight, balanced driving has earned him top honors from the American Le Mans Series as Rookie of the Year and Champion Driver in 2010. His races often end with stints on the podium, and his career has only just begun.

As Tucker, his co-drivers Christophe Bouchut and Luis Diaz and team manager David Stone prepare to shut the season with the all-important Petit Le Mans and the Ferrari International Finals, the stakes are high-the team has woven itself a reputation of excellence that is best understood by looking back at what has made 2011 a stupendous year for Level 5 Motorsports.

In January, the Level 5 team began its 2011 race schedule with the GRAND-AM The Roar before the 24 test sessions, in Daytona, Florida. Its two Microsoft Office-sponsored entries proved themselves powerful vehicles for their drivers’ talents. During the final test session the No. 055 Microsoft Office BMW Riley and the No. 95 Microsoft Office BMW Riley finished 2-3. Tucker, Bouchut, Diaz and Mark Wilkins drove the No. 55 and sped through a 127.533 mph lap, just a half-second behind Starworks Motorsports Ford Riley, No. 8. Tucker also drove the No. 95, along with Ryan Hunter-Reay, Raphael Matos and Richard Westbrook. The drivers completed a lap of 127.465 mph, a time less than one-tenth of a second off of the No. 55 BMW Riley.

The Level 5 team proved its versatility since the season opened up with rule changes and a freshly paved racetrack at Daytona International Speedway. The three-day test session for the GRAND-AM Rolex Sports Car Series was an indicator of things to come for the team. During the practiced sessions, the team gradually built momentum by making small changes with every run, eventually building up to the point that the drivers were barely off the top speed by weekend’s end.

While in the fourth test session, the No. 95 rose to 5th on the speed chart with a lap of 125.898 mph. Its counterpart, the No. 55, earned its way to a second-place position by the sixth session with a lap of 126.9189 mph.

Not simply did Tucker drive both cars for the Roar before the 24, he was also a participant in the Sports Car Club of America’s Double National event at Sebring International Raceway in Sebring, Florida. He finished second both days of the race. “I want as much time on the track as possible,” he said at the time. “Getting in tune with the car is paramount to setting up for a successful season.”

The Roar before the 24 is much like preseason games in other sports; it gives drivers a chance to shake off any lingering problems from the previous year and preview the type of year that is to come. Many big motorsports names are on hand at the Roar before the 24, and many of the stars who test at the Roar are enrolled in the Rolex 24 at Daytona during subsequent weekends.

The results of the Roar prior to the 24 set Level 5 Motorsports in a perfect position for season’s start: beating the competition, but with some room for improvement. By exhibiting talent, control and skill on the raceway, Tucker and his teammates immediately established Level 5 Motorsports as a frontrunner for the coming races. Next up: the Rolex 24.

Find more about Scott Tucker Scott Tucker .

Feb 222012
 

Scott Tucker was going to race Level 5 Motorsports’ new HPD ARX-01g car the second he could. That determination was evident when he and his awesome team decided to delay until the last possible minute to produce a sound decision on the Six Hours of Silverstone race: It was all or nothing. Unfortunately, cost-capped wheels for the car weren’t accessible in time for Level 5 to maintain its entry in Silverstone; Tucker withdrew. “I knew there was a risk in waiting for the parts, with them not being guaranteed,” Tucker states. “But the car is undoubtedly the best vehicle performance-wise that we can get, so I was determined to give it a shot. The HPD engine and chassis combination has proved to be the best over the years.We feel very comfortable and confident in making this unprecedented and decisive move.” Determination, risk, and refusing to settle for anything but the best-sounds similar to racing.

Calculated decisions and ultimate control are part of what makes drivers successful, and Level 5 has had its great number of success. The team made podium finishes in some of the biggest races of the past year, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 6 hours of Imola.

Last month, the crew competed in the four-mile Road America circuit for the sixth round of the ALMS season and won its class, which continued Level 5’s undefeated record in American Le Mans Series competition this season. In that one weekend, Tucker, the reigning ALMS LMPC champion, tackled six races in four different series. He earned podium finishes in the IMSA Prototype Lites, IMSA GT3 Challenge by Yokohama and SCCA Pro Racing Trans-Am races, and then he won the Trans-Am T2 class, his 55th career victory in international competition. Co-driver Luis Diaz earned his 10th career ALMS victory. “As far as I know, the championship is now locked up,” team manager David Stone said.

Still, as Tucker and co-drivers Christophe Bouchut and Luis Diaz hit the street with all the new HPD ARX-01g at the LMS enduro today, they’ll have plenty of catching up to do after taking Silverstone off. “As a team, you never want to miss a race, a practice or a chance to prepare,” Tucker says. “But we’re really looking to perform well and get acquainted with the HPD ARX-01g at Mazda Laguna Seca so we can look ahead to Petit.”

While considering choices for the Silverstone race, Level 5 was given the option to compete with the HPD ARX-01g using grandfathered-in specifications, but the team ultimately decided that racing with modified specifications on the car would defeat its purpose. In order to prepare the car for the six-hour LMS enduro today, additional mechanics flew to the Wirth workshop in England last week. When it was finished, the car got a one-way ticket to San Francisco.

Preliminary tests using the HPD ARX-01g were promising, with all three drivers optimistic about the weekend’s race. Especially important was calibrating the drivers’ balances with the new vehicle. Tucker, who began his driving career in 2006, continues to be noted for his unwavering balance since he began. At his first appearance in Le Mans, the Super Bowl of motorsports, he cranked more than 200mph-in the dark- with an Audi R10, the first American to be behind an Audi turbodiesel’s wheel in competition. His decision to skip Silverstone hearkens the same calm confidence. With a winning year already clinched, committing to the Six Hours of Silverstone in the old car just wasn’t as valuable as the possibility that Level 5 might be able to drive its HPD ARX-01g. Just as in races, Tucker set his sights on a goal and let the situation unfold. However the Silverstone absence meant lost time and points, Tucker and his team are just preparing for a winning finish to an already dazzling year.

When making up for lost some time and points, Level 5 intends to contest the final two ILMC rounds in Atlanta and China.

Find more information about champion driver Scott Tucker Scott Tucker

Feb 222012
 

Scott Tucker with the exceptional Level 5 Motorsports teammates recently began the final quarter of a racing year which has included numerous podium appearances, multiple car changes, incredible accomplishments and yet still room for improvement. Tucker, owner and driver for Level 5, has been a leader to the team in spite of the rookie status he maintained just months ago. His tight, balanced driving has earned him top honors from the American Le Mans Series as Rookie of the Year and Champion Driver in 2010. His races often end with stints on the podium, and his career only has just begun.

As Tucker, his co-drivers Christophe Bouchut and Luis Diaz and team manager David Stone prepare to shut the season with all the all-important Petit Le Mans and the Ferrari International Finals, the stakes are high-the team has woven itself a reputation of excellence that is best understood by looking back at what has made 2011 a beautiful year for Level 5 Motorsports.

In January, the Level 5 team began its 2011 race schedule with the GRAND-AM The Roar before the 24 test sessions, in Daytona, Florida. Its two Microsoft Office-sponsored entries proved themselves powerful vehicles for their drivers’ talents. Throughout the final test session the No. 055 Microsoft Office BMW Riley and the No. 95 Microsoft Office BMW Riley finished 2-3. Tucker, Bouchut, Diaz and Mark Wilkins drove the No. 55 and sped through a 127.533 mph lap, just a half-second behind Starworks Motorsports Ford Riley, No. 8. Tucker also drove the No. 95, along with Ryan Hunter-Reay, Raphael Matos and Richard Westbrook. The drivers completed a lap of 127.465 mph, a time less than one-tenth of a second off of the No. 55 BMW Riley.

The Level 5 team proved its versatility as the season opened up with rule changes and a freshly paved racetrack at Daytona International Speedway. The three-day test session for the GRAND-AM Rolex Sports Car Series was an indicator of things to come for the team. All through the practiced sessions, the team gradually built momentum by developing small changes with every run, eventually building up to the point that the drivers were barely off the top speed by weekend’s end.

In the fourth test session, the No. 95 rose to 5th on the speed chart with a lap of 125.898 mph. Its counterpart, the No. 55, earned its way to a second-place position by the sixth session with a lap of 126.9189 mph.

But not only did Tucker drive both cars for the Roar before the 24, he was also a participant in the Sports Car Club of America’s Double National event at Sebring International Raceway in Sebring, Florida. He finished second both days of the race. “I want as much time on the track as possible,” he said at the time. “Getting in tune with the car is paramount to setting up for a successful season.”

The Roar prior to the 24 is much like preseason games in other sports; it gives drivers a chance to shake off any lingering problems from the previous year and preview the type of year that is to come. Many big motorsports names are on hand at the Roar before the 24, and many of the stars who test at the Roar are enrolled in the Rolex 24 at Daytona during subsequent weekends.

End result of the Roar before the 24 set Level 5 Motorsports in a perfect position for season’s start: beating the competition, but with some room for improvement. By exhibiting talent, control and skill on the raceway, Tucker and his teammates immediately established Level 5 Motorsports as a frontrunner for the coming races. Next up: the Rolex 24.

Scott Tucker and Level 5 scored a commanding victory in the 2011 Petit Le Mans and secured the 2011 American Le Mans LMP2 Championship Scott Tucker

Feb 222012
 

A while back, Scott Tucker-owned Level 5 Motorsports announced the addition of Marino Franchitti to its driver lineup before this weekend’s Petit Le Mans race at Road Atlanta. Franchitti will join Tucker and fellow driver Luis Diaz in driving the No. 55 Microsoft Office-sponsored entry for the enduro, a 1,000-mile/10-hour race.

Franchitti is the latest addition to Tucker’s superteam of motorsports competitors, which was established through the Level 5 Motorsports team’s 3 years of existence. Franchitti will be especially handy in driving the brand new Level 5 entry, a LMP2-class Honda Performance Development prototype developed in conjunction with Wirth Research. Prior to joining Level 5, Franchitti had raced essentially every iteration of HPD prototypes, such as the original ARX-01a with Andretti Green Racing in 2007 and Highcroft’s 2010 ALMS championship winner ARX-01c as well as its ARX-01e, which took 2nd place overall at the 12 Hours of Sebring a few months ago. Franchitti this year will be seeking his 3rd straight Petit Le Mans class victory.

The elite Level 5 team started out when Tucker got into the world of professional motorsports in 2006 when he was 44. What he was missing in experience he made up for in natural talent, quickly climbing the motorsports rankings. Initially, he joined up with Christophe Bouchut, an endurance racing expert, who acted as his coach and co-driver. Bouchut is probably the best endurance drivers globally and a past winner of the Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway, the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps. He has also won 3 Porsche Carrera Cup France championships, 3 FIA GT titles and an FFSA GT championship. He is the only triple FIA GT champion in history. Since Level 5 Motorsports team began in 2008, Bouchut has co-driven with Tucker and been integral in the team’s success. With his wealth of experience and skill in controlled speed, Bouchut’s role as lead driver has allowed Tucker to develop his own skills, increasing the depth of the Level 5 racing team. Within the 2010 season, Bouchut earned his 100th career victory.

Joao Barbosa, another Level 5 Motorsports standout started his racing career in his native Porto, Portugal nearly Thirty years ago. He won back-to-back kart championships in 1988-1989 and proceeded to win the Portuguese Formula Ford championship in 1994 and the Italian Formula Alfa Boxter Championship in 1995. In 2001, he joined the Grand-Am Sports Car Series and competed in the GT class until he joined the Brumos Racing team in a Daytona prototype in 2006. After four seasons there, he joined Action Express Racing and won the Rolex 24 at Daytona in 2010. Last year, he also made seven starts in the ALMS for Extreme Speed Motorsports in the GT2 class.

Luis Diaz, the 3rd part to this weekend’s Petit Le Mans bid, comes from Mexico City, Mexico. He ran in the Toyota Atlantic and Indy Lights Series from 1999-2003 prior to the move to Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series in 2004 when he co-drove the No. 1 car with former Champ Car competitor Scott Pruett for Chip Ganassi Racing. In 2007, he moved into the ALMS, driving an LMP2 Lola B06/43-Acura for Fernandez Racing. The pairing finished sixth in the LMP2 standings that year and won the class championship in 2009. Diaz made his Level 5 debut this year at the Rolex 24 at Daytona, an excellent start to the season, and his LMP2 experience will be very helpful at Petit Le Mans with the new car.

Ryan Hunter-Reay has been off the grid for the majority of the 2011 season as Tucker and crew have been devoted to the ALMS and LMP2 class, but he has been a big reason for the Level 5 team’s overall success. He will be a regular in the IZOD IndyCar Series for Andretti Autosport, where he nabbed his second win at Iowa Speedway this past year. Hunter-Reay helped the No. 95 Level 5 Motorsports BMW Riley to a third-place finish in the 2010 Rolex 24 at Daytona.

Looking for Scott Tucker News? Scott Tucker .

Feb 222012
 

Last week, Scott Tucker-owned Level 5 Motorsports announced the addition of Marino Franchitti to its driver lineup before this weekend’s Petit Le Mans race at Road Atlanta. Franchitti will join Tucker and fellow driver Luis Diaz in driving the No. 55 Microsoft Office-sponsored entry for the enduro, a 1,000-mile/10-hour race.

Franchitti is the latest addition to Tucker’s superteam of motorsports competitors, that is established through the entire Level 5 Motorsports team’s three years of existence. Franchitti will be especially handy in driving the latest Level 5 entry, a LMP2-class Honda Performance Development prototype developed in conjunction with Wirth Research. Prior to joining Level 5, Franchitti had raced essentially every iteration of HPD prototypes, for example the original ARX-01a with Andretti Green Racing in 2007 and Highcroft’s 2010 ALMS championship winner ARX-01c as well as its ARX-01e, which took 2nd place overall in the 12 Hours of Sebring earlier this year. Franchitti this year could be seeking his 3rd consecutive Petit Le Mans class victory.

The elite Level 5 team started when Tucker came into the realm of professional motorsports in 2006 at 44. What he was lacking in experience he made up for in natural ability, easily climbing the motorsports rankings. At the beginning, he joined up with Christophe Bouchut, an endurance racing veteran, who acted as his mentor and co-driver. Bouchut has become the most successful endurance drivers on earth and a past winner of the Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway, the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps. He has also won three Porsche Carrera Cup France championships, three FIA GT titles and an FFSA GT championship. He’s the only triple FIA GT champion in history. Since the Level 5 Motorsports team began in 2008, Bouchut has co-driven with Tucker and been integral in the team’s success. With his wealth of experience and skill in controlled speed, Bouchut’s role as lead driver has allowed Tucker to develop his own skills, adding to the depth of the Level 5 racing team. During the 2010 season, Bouchut earned his 100th career victory.

Joao Barbosa, another Level 5 Motorsports standout began his racing career in his native Porto, Portugal nearly 3 decades ago. He won back-to-back kart championships in 1988-1989 and continued to win the Portuguese Formula Ford championship in 1994 and the Italian Formula Alfa Boxter Championship in 1995. In 2001, he joined the Grand-Am Sports Car Series and competed in the GT class until he joined the Brumos Racing team in a Daytona prototype in 2006. After four seasons there, he joined Action Express Racing and won the Rolex 24 at Daytona in 2010. Last year, he also made seven starts in the ALMS for Extreme Speed Motorsports in the GT2 class.

Luis Diaz, the third part to this weekend’s Petit Le Mans bid, hails from Mexico City, Mexico. He ran in the Toyota Atlantic and Indy Lights Series from 1999-2003 prior to the move to Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series in 2004 when he co-drove the No. 1 car with former Champ Car competitor Scott Pruett for Chip Ganassi Racing. In 2007, he moved into the ALMS, driving an LMP2 Lola B06/43-Acura for Fernandez Racing. The pairing finished 6th in the LMP2 standings that year and won the class championship in 2009. Diaz made his Level 5 debut this year at the Rolex 24 at Daytona, a successful start to the season, and his LMP2 experience might be very helpful at Petit Le Mans with the new car.

Ryan Hunter-Reay has been off the grid for much of this year’s season as Tucker and crew have been devoted to the ALMS and LMP2 class, but he has been a significant contributor to the Level 5 team’s overall success. He is a regular in the IZOD IndyCar Series for Andretti Autosport, where he nabbed his 2nd win at Iowa Speedway last year. Hunter-Reay helped the No. 95 Level 5 Motorsports BMW Riley to a third-place finish in the 2010 Rolex 24 at Daytona.

Want more about celebrity Scott Tucker Scott Tucker .